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Summary: Postscripts, 2009 - The Elephant Forgets — LiveJournal
ecbatan
Summary: Postscripts, 2009
Summary: Postscripts, 2009

The UK-based magazine Postscripts officially is now an anthology. This change is accompanied by a slight change in format, and by elimination of the (already sparse) features. For all that it still feels like the same old Postscripts to me, and I'm going to continue to list it as a magazine (much as I have done with Tales of the Unanticipated). Three issues appeared in 2009 -- though the last was a double issue (and literally so, with twice as much word count as the other issues). The editors are Peter Crowther and Nick Gevers.

The issues in 2009 contained about 287,000 words of new fiction. There were 15 novelettes and 33 short stories, four of them short-shorts.

Of the novelettes, my clear favorite was Daniel Abraham's "Balfour and Meriwether in the Adventure of the Emperor's Vengeance" (#19), sort of "secret history steampunk" about the bad things that happen when an archaelogist uncovers an ancient robot from an Egyptian tomb. Other good novelettes included two Luff Imbry stories by Matthew Hughes, "Enemy of the Good" (#18) and "Another Day in Fibbery" (#20/21); and a weird futuristic vampire story by Tony Ballantyne, "Vampire Electric" (#20/21). Other good novelettes came from Chris Beckett, Chris Roberson, and Stephen Baxter.

Of the short stories, my favorite was "The Persistence of Memory; or, This Space for Sale", by Paul Park (#20/21), in which the author auctions a story -- character and subject -- and ends up writing about a woman the winning bidder regrets losing. Also from #20/21, I liked Lisa Tuttle's "Ragged Claws", about a man recruiting colonists for a distant planet. And from #18, Norman Prentiss's "In the Porches of My Ears", a sweet sad story about a couple at the movies and their reaction to another couple: a blind man and his wife, who narrates the entire movie to him. Other good work was done by Deborah Kalin, Marly Youmans, and Robert Reed.

Last year I wrote: "On the whole I would rank this is perhaps the best year yet for Postscripts". Alas, this year seemed rather weak to me, taken in toto.

Statistics: 9 of 48 stories, almost 19%, were by women. (This is the highest proportion in the last few years.) I would call perhaps 23 of the 48 stories from 2009 Science Fiction, or 48%, rather less than last year, but last year included a special Science Fiction issue.

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