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Summary: Lightspeed, 2010 - The Elephant Forgets
ecbatan
Summary: Lightspeed, 2010
Summary: Lightspeed, 2010

Lightspeed is a new webzine focused on Science Fiction, edited by John Joseph Adams, who was formerly an assistant to Gordon Van Gelder at F&SF, and who has also put out an impressive bundle of anthologies, both original and reprint (indeed, usually combined), over the past few years. Its first issue was in June, and it has had about as impressive a debut as any fiction webzine ever -- or at least since Sci Fiction! It is a companion of Fantasy Magazine. It publishes two original short stories and two reprints each month, as well as some nonfiction and some art.

I counted just about 70,000 words of original fiction this year. This was 16 stories, all short stories. Indeed, my main complaint about this 'zine (a complaint that also applies to Fantasy) is that they don't publish longer stories.

As I said, I thought it an excellent debut. I am taking four stories for my Best of the Year anthology. These are "No Time Like the Present", by Carol Emshwiller (July), about a teenaged girl's reaction to the sudden appearance in her town of a number of wealthy new residents; "Arvies", by Adam-Troy Castro (August), about a far future in which unborn humans use mature bodies as "carriers" of a sort; "Flower, Mercy, Needle, Chain", by Yoon Ha Lee (September), which in its brief space spans great time, and many universes, as we learn the history of an assassin, and the nature of her gun; and "Standard Loneliness Package", by Charles Yu (November), about a service oustourcing the burden of certain negative experiences from its customers. Similarly good were "Hwang's Billion Brilliant Daughters", by Alice Sola Kim (November), about a man who skips forward in time whenever he sleeps; and "Amaryllis", by Carrie Vaughn, about an ecologically constrained future, and a ship captain with a crew woman who wants permission to have a child. There was other fine work from Ted Kosmatka, Catherynne M. Valente, and Vylar Kaftan -- really, an excellent half year+ of fiction/

All 16 stories qualify as SF, and 9 of the 16 (56%) are by women.

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